Salt Laden Path

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Coastal path, Moelfre, Anglesey, Jan Malique

I’m inclined to call myself a non-poet, it’s an art difficult to master in my mind. Yet, there are times when the spirit of a place touches a part of me hidden within the soul. Being near the sea seems to trigger such deep seated emotions, maybe because I love it so much. Panoramic skies and endless horizons combine to thrill the adventurer in me. Sky, Sea and Earth meld together to weave melancholic and hypnotic songs; which are picked up by those with the ears to hear them. This may be an idealised vision of a place that can be dangerous and fearful in its elemental power, but can you not feel its pull?

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Coastal path, Moelfre, Anglesey, Jan Malique

We walked these salt laden paths,

Eyes on the horizon and hunger in our souls.

***

Hardened fisher folk and sailors with tales to tell,

Of disembarking with precious goods for table and merchants galore,

And wind blasted lips cursing the elements.

***

We walked these salt laden paths,

Eyes on the horizon and hunger in our souls.

***

We toiled till our hands bled,

With blood nourished by salty tears,

And memories lying like bloated corpses,

On boiling seas and carriages of wood.

***

We walked these salt laden paths,

Eyes on the horizon and hunger in our souls.

***

The wind carries our songs of toil and petitions,

To ancient gods and forebears long distant.

How the hymns rise on wings of hope,

Voices break with desperation and,

Mysteries sublime.

***

Now is the time of our shades disappearing,

As the refrain rises for one last time,

We walked these salt laden paths,

Eyes on the horizon and hunger in our souls.

 

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17 comments on “Salt Laden Path

  1. ❤ Love this ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Reblogged this on Not Tomatoes and commented:
    And she says she’s not a poet…

    Liked by 1 person

  3. bobcabkings says:

    Oh, for sure, there is a poet in you somewhere. I come away from this thinking of the third stanza of Tennyson’s “Ulysses”, and setting sail again. It is long, so just a few lines:

    “Some work of noble note, may yet be done,
    Not unbecoming men that strove with Gods.”

    Liked by 1 person

    • janmalique says:

      “Much have I seen and known; cities of men
      And manners, climates, councils, governments,
      Myself not least, but honour’d of them all;
      And drunk delight of battle with my peers,
      Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy.
      I am a part of all that I have met”

      It’s not false modesty, I’ve never considered myself a poet. More a teller of stories. I love the sounds and rhythms of words and if what is produced is poetry, fab! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • bobcabkings says:

        Perhaps, then, you might describe yourself as an accidental poet. That love of the sound and rhythms shows in your prose as well, as it does in much fine writing. I think the best writing is that which feels good in the mouth and the ear when read aloud.

        Liked by 1 person

      • janmalique says:

        “An accidental poet”, what a wonderful description! I like that. Agree with your point about the best writing feeling good in the mouth and ear. A reminder of why we are entranced by the spoken word. The act of uttering the words initiates a magical process. I could listen at great length to anything recited by Richard Burton.

        Liked by 1 person

      • bobcabkings says:

        Mr. Burton could turn even some quite mediocre lines into magic.

        I believe that that connection between the written and spoken word is reason why parents and others should read good writing to children as much as possible.

        Liked by 1 person

      • janmalique says:

        He did have a marvellous voice, a sad loss.

        Reading to children is essential to develop their imaginations; and enable them to socialise with people in a healthy manner.

        Liked by 1 person

      • bobcabkings says:

        There is a Burton reading of The Ancient Mariner on You Tube, also one by Orson Wells.

        Liked by 1 person

      • janmalique says:

        I’ll have a look at the weekend Robert. Forgot about Orson Welles. His voice was steeped in gravitas.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. bobcabkings says:

    Reblogged this on cabbagesandkings524 and commented:
    Jan Malique may question whether she is a poet. One could well argue that based on this.

    Liked by 1 person

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